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You can publish an open access article in this journal

Description

Railway Sciences (RS) is an international, open access, peer-reviewed journal publishing research covering all aspects of railway, in association with China Academy of Railway Sciences.

Railway Sciences (RS) aims to serve the world's railway modernisation, promote high-level academic research and exchange, and display advanced achievements in basic theoretical research, and scientific and technological innovation. It is to provide a platform to publish the original and significant papers on railway design and planning, civil engineering, equipment and systems, transportation operation and management and other related topics.

To submit to the journal, please go to ScholarOne manuscripts portal. Please follow the author guidelines before submitting.

All articles are published open access, so are made freely available at no charge to the author.

Railway Sciences is published by Emerald Publishing on behalf of China Academy of Railway Sciences, who owns the title. Railway Sciences is published under a platinum OA arrangement, in that all charges for publishing an OA article in the journal are funded by China Academy of Railway Sciences. Therefore, there is no charge to the author.

  • Editor-in-Chief

  • Honorary Director

    • Youmei Liu
      CRRC Zhuzhou Institute Co., Ltd.
    • Jing Zhou
      China Academy of Railway Sciences, China
  • Director

    • Chunfang Lu
      China Railway Society, China
  • Associate Director

    • Xiangsheng Chen
      Shenzhen University, China
    • Yongfu Sun
      Chinese Academy of Engineering, China
  • Editorial Assistant

  • Editorial Board

    • Mingzhe An
      Beijing Jiaotong University, China
    • Nikola Besinovic
      Delft University of Technology, Netherlands
    • Hua Chen
      Railway Technical Research Institute, Japan
    • Colin Cole
      Centre for Railway Engineering CQ University, Australia
    • Rongjun Ding
      CRRC Zhuzhou Institute Co., Ltd., China
    • Limin Jia
      Beijing Jiaotong University, China
    • Ming Jiang
      CRSC Research & Design Institute Group Co. Ltd, China
    • Preston John
      University of Southampton, UK
    • Md Kamruzzaman
      Monash University, Australia
    • Lewis Roger Lewis Roger
      Department of Mechanical Engineering, Sheffield University, UK
    • Dingqing Li
      Transportation Technology Center, Inc., USA
    • Zili Li
      Technische University of Delft, Netherlands
    • Carlton Louis Ho
      University of Massachusetts Amherst, USA
    • Qingzhong Luo
      China Academy of Railway Sciences, China
    • Xicheng Luo
      Railway Technology Research Institute, Korea
    • Jiangguo Nie
      Tsinghua university, China
    • Yanhui Qi
      China Academy of Railway Sciences, China
    • Markus Roggenbach
      University of Swansea, UK
    • Tianyun Shi
      China Academy of Railway Sciences, China
    • Xinggao Shu
      Transportation Technology Center, Inc., USA
    • Lisa A. Stabler
      Transportation Technology Center, Inc., USA
    • Sebastian Stichel
      Rail Commission of UIC, Sweden
    • David J. Tompston
      University of Southampton, UK
    • Jun Wang
      CRRC Corporation Ltd, China
    • Junbiao Wang
      China Academy of Railway Sciences, China
    • Tongjun Wang
      China State Railway Group Co., Ltd., China
    • Yangsheng Ye
      China State Railway Group Co., Ltd., China
    • Jabbarali Zakeri
      Iran university of science and Technology, Iran
    • Wanming Zhai
      Southwest Jiaotong University, China
    • Weihua Zhang
      Southwest Jiaotong University, China
    • Zhiqiang Zhang
      Southwest Jiaotong University, China
    • Li Zhou
      China State Railway Group Co., Ltd., China
    • Shunhua Zhou
      Tongji university, China
    • Xuesong Zhou
      Arizonan State University, USA
    • Shaotong Zhu
      China Academy of Railway Sciences, China
  • Journal Editorial Office (For queries related to pre-acceptance)

  • Supplier Project Manager (For queries related to post-acceptance)

  • Publishing Services Manager

Before you start

For queries relating to the status of your paper pre decision, please contact the Editor or Journal Editorial Office. For queries post acceptance, please contact the Supplier Project Manager. These details can be found in the Editorial Team section.

Author responsibilities

Our goal is to provide you with a professional and courteous experience at each stage of the review and publication process. There are also some responsibilities that sit with you as the author. Our expectation is that you will:

  • Respond swiftly to any queries during the publication process.
  • Be accountable for all aspects of your work. This includes investigating and resolving any questions about accuracy or research integrity
  • Treat communications between you and the journal editor as confidential until an editorial decision has been made.
  • Read about our research ethics for authorship. These state that you must:
    • Include anyone who has made a substantial and meaningful contribution to the submission (anyone else involved in the paper should be listed in the acknowledgements).
    • Exclude anyone who hasn’t contributed to the paper, or who has chosen not to be associated with the research.
  • If your article involves human participants, you must ensure you have considered whether or not you require ethical approval for your research, and include this information as part of your submission. Find out more about informed consent.

Research and publishing ethics

Our editors and employees work hard to ensure the content we publish is ethically sound. To help us achieve that goal, we closely follow the advice laid out in the guidelines and flowcharts on the COPE (Committee on Publication Ethics) website.

We have also developed our research and publishing ethics guidelines. If you haven’t already read these, we urge you to do so – they will help you avoid the most common publishing ethics issues.

A few key points:

  • Any manuscript you submit to this journal should be original. That means it should not have been published before in its current, or similar, form. Exceptions to this rule are outlined in our pre-print and conference paper policies.  If any substantial element of your paper has been previously published, you need to declare this to the journal editor upon submission. Please note, the journal editor may use iThenticate to check on the originality of submissions received. This service compares submissions against a database of 49 million works from 800 scholarly publishers.
  • Your work should not have been submitted elsewhere and should not be under consideration by any other publication.
  • If you have a conflict of interest, you must declare it upon submission; this allows the editor to decide how they would like to proceed. Read about conflict of interest in our research and publishing ethics guidelines.
  • By submitting your work to Emerald, you are guaranteeing that the work is not in infringement of any existing copyright.

Third party copyright permissions

Prior to article submission, you need to ensure you’ve applied for, and received, written permission to use any material in your manuscript that has been created by a third party. Please note, we are unable to publish any article that still has permissions pending. The rights we require are:

  • Non-exclusive rights to reproduce the material in the article or book chapter.
  • Print and electronic rights.
  • Worldwide English-language rights.
  • To use the material for the life of the work. That means there should be no time restrictions on its re-use e.g. a one-year licence.

We are a member of the International Association of Scientific, Technical, and Medical Publishers (STM) and participate in the STM permissions guidelines, a reciprocal free exchange of material with other STM publishers.  In some cases, this may mean that you don’t need permission to re-use content. If so, please highlight this at the submission stage.

Please take a few moments to read our guide to publishing permissions to ensure you have met all the requirements, so that we can process your submission without delay.

Open access information

This is a sponsored open access journal, also referred to as platinum open access. Because it is published in partnership with an organisation, your article will be published open access, but you will not have to pay an APC (article processing charge) - publication is free. Your article will be published with a Creative Commons CC BY 4.0 user licence, which outlines how readers can reuse your work.

You can find out more about our open access routes and read our FAQs on our open research page. 

Find out about open

Transparency and Openness Promotion (TOP) guidelines

We are a signatory of the Transparency and Openness Promotion (TOP) Guidelines, a framework that supports the reproducibility of research through the adoption of transparent research practices. That means we encourage you to:

  • Cite and fully reference all data, program code, and other methods in your article.
  • Include persistent identifiers, such as a Digital Object Identifier (DOI), in references for datasets and program codes. Persistent identifiers ensure future access to unique published digital objects, such as a piece of text or datasets. Persistent identifiers are assigned to datasets by digital archives, such as institutional repositories and partners in the Data Preservation Alliance for the Social Sciences (Data-PASS).
  • Follow appropriate international and national procedures with respect to data protection, rights to privacy and other ethical considerations, whenever you cite data. For further guidance please refer to our research and publishing ethics guidelines. For an example on how to cite datasets, please refer to the references section below.

Prepare your submission

Manuscript support services

We are pleased to partner with Editage, a platform that connects you with relevant experts in language support, translation, editing, visuals, consulting, and more. After you’ve agreed a fee, they will work with you to enhance your manuscript and get it submission-ready.

This is an optional service for authors who feel they need a little extra support. It does not guarantee your work will be accepted for review or publication.

Visit Editage

Manuscript requirements

Before you submit your manuscript, it’s important you read and follow the guidelines below. You will also find some useful tips in our structure your journal submission how-to guide.

Format

Article files should be provided in Microsoft Word format

While you are welcome to submit a PDF of the document alongside the Word file, PDFs alone are not acceptable. LaTeX files can also be used but only if an accompanying PDF document is provided. Acceptable figure file types are listed further below.

Article length / word count

Articles should be between 5000 and 10000 words in length. This includes all text, for example, the structured abstract, references, all text in tables, and figures and appendices.

 

Please allow 280 words for each figure or table.

Article title

A concisely worded title should be provided.

Author details

The names of all contributing authors should be added to the ScholarOne submission; please list them in the order in which you’d like them to be published. Each contributing author will need their own ScholarOne author account, from which we will extract the following details:

  • Author email address (institutional preferred).
  • Author name. We will reproduce it exactly, so any middle names and/or initials they want featured must be included.
  • Author affiliation. This should be where they were based when the research for the paper was conducted.

In multi-authored papers, it’s important that ALL authors that have made a significant contribution to the paper are listed. Those who have provided support but have not contributed to the research should be featured in an acknowledgements section. You should never include people who have not contributed to the paper or who don’t want to be associated with the research. Read about our research ethics for authorship.

Biographies and acknowledgements

If you want to include these items, save them in a separate Microsoft Word document and upload the file with your submission. Where they are included, a brief professional biography of not more than 100 words should be supplied for each named author.

Research funding

Your article must reference all sources of external research funding in the acknowledgements section. You should describe the role of the funder or financial sponsor in the entire research process, from study design to submission.

Structured abstract

All submissions must include a structured abstract, following the format outlined below.

These four sub-headings and their accompanying explanations must always be included:

  • Purpose
  • Design/methodology/approach
  • Findings
  • Originality

The following three sub-headings are optional and can be included, if applicable:

  • Research limitations/implications
  • Practical implications
  • Social implications


You can find some useful tips in our write an article abstract how-to guide.

The maximum length of your abstract should be 350 words in total, including keywords and article classification (see the sections below).

Keywords

Your submission should include up to 12 appropriate and short keywords that capture the principal topics of the paper. Our Creating an SEO-friendly manuscript how to guide contains some practical guidance on choosing search-engine friendly keywords.

Please note, while we will always try to use the keywords you’ve suggested, the in-house editorial team may replace some of them with matching terms to ensure consistency across publications and improve your article’s visibility.

Article classification

During the submission process, you will be asked to select a type for your paper; the options are listed below. If you don’t see an exact match, please choose the best fit:

  • Research Paper    
  • Case Study    
  • Practitioner Paper    
  • Technical Paper

You will also be asked to select a category for your paper. The options for this are listed below. If you don’t see an exact match, please choose the best fit:

Research paper. Reports on any type of research undertaken by the author(s), including:

  • The construction or testing of a model or framework
  • Action research
  • Testing of data, market research or surveys
  • Empirical, scientific or clinical research
  • Papers with a practical focus

Viewpoint. Covers any paper where content is dependent on the author's opinion and interpretation. This includes journalistic and magazine-style pieces.

Technical paper. Describes and evaluates technical products, processes or services.

Conceptual paper. Focuses on developing hypotheses and is usually discursive. Covers philosophical discussions and comparative studies of other authors’ work and thinking.

Case study. Describes actual interventions or experiences within organizations. It can be subjective and doesn’t generally report on research. Also covers a description of a legal case or a hypothetical case study used as a teaching exercise.

Literature review. This category should only be used if the main purpose of the paper is to annotate and/or critique the literature in a particular field. It could be a selective bibliography providing advice on information sources, or the paper may aim to cover the main contributors to the development of a topic and explore their different views.

General review. Provides an overview or historical examination of some concept, technique or phenomenon. Papers are likely to be more descriptive or instructional (‘how to’ papers) than discursive.

Headings

Headings must be concise, with a clear indication of the required hierarchy. 

The preferred format is for first level headings to be in bold, and subsequent sub-headings to be in medium italics.

Notes/endnotes

Notes or endnotes should only be used if absolutely necessary. They should be identified in the text by consecutive numbers enclosed in square brackets. These numbers should then be listed, and explained, at the end of the article.

Figures

All figures (charts, diagrams, line drawings, webpages/screenshots, and photographic images) should be submitted electronically. Both colour and black and white files are accepted.

There are a few other important points to note:

  • All figures should be supplied at the highest resolution/quality possible with numbers and text clearly legible.
  • Acceptable formats are .ai, .eps, .jpeg, .bmp, and .tif.
  • Electronic figures created in other applications should be supplied in their original formats and should also be either copied and pasted into a blank MS Word document, or submitted as a PDF file.
  • All figures should be numbered consecutively with Arabic numerals and have clear captions.
  • All photographs should be numbered as Plate 1, 2, 3, etc. and have clear captions.

Tables

Tables should be typed and submitted in a separate file to the main body of the article. The position of each table should be clearly labelled in the main body of the article with corresponding labels clearly shown in the table file. Tables should be numbered consecutively in Roman numerals (e.g. I, II, etc.).

Give each table a brief title. Ensure that any superscripts or asterisks are shown next to the relevant items and have explanations displayed as footnotes to the table, figure or plate.

Supplementary files

Where tables, figures, appendices, and other additional content are supplementary to the article but not critical to the reader’s understanding of it, you can choose to host these supplementary files alongside your article on Insight, Emerald’s content hosting platform, or on an institutional or personal repository. All supplementary material must be submitted prior to acceptance.

If you choose to host your supplementary files on Insight, you must submit these as separate files alongside your article. Files should be clearly labelled in such a way that makes it clear they are supplementary; Emerald recommends that the file name is descriptive and that it follows the format ‘Supplementary_material_appendix_1’ or ‘Supplementary tables’. All supplementary material must be mentioned at the appropriate moment in the main text of the article, there is no need to include the content of the file but only the file name. A link to the supplementary material will be added to the article during production, and the material will be made available alongside the main text of the article at the point of EarlyCite publication.

Please note that Emerald will not make any changes to the material; it will not be copyedited, typeset, and authors will not receive proofs. Emerald therefore strongly recommends that you style all supplementary material ahead of acceptance of the article.

Emerald Insight can host the following file types and extensions:

  • Adobe Acrobat (.pdf)
  • MS Word document (.doc, .docx)
  • MS Excel (.xls, xlsx)
  • MS PowerPoint (.pptx)
  • Image (.png, .jpeg, .gif)
  • Plain ASCII text (.txt)
  • PostScript (.ps)
  • Rich Text Format (.rtf)

If you choose to use an institutional or personal repository, you should ensure that the supplementary material is hosted on the repository ahead of submission, and then include a link only to the repository within the article. It is the responsibility of the submitting author to ensure that the material is free to access and that it remains permanently available.

Please note that extensive supplementary material may be subject to peer review; this is at the discretion of the journal Editor and dependent on the content of the material (for example, whether including it would support the reviewer making a decision on the article during the peer review process).

References

References to other publications must be in APA style and carefully checked for completeness, accuracy and consistency. This is very important in an electronic environment because it enables your readers to exploit the Reference Linking facility on the database and link back to the works you have cited through CrossRef.

Invert all authors’ names; give surnames and initials for up to and including seven authors. When authors number eight or more, include the first six authors’ names, then insert three ellipsis points, and add the last author’s name. For example:

Gilbert, D. G., McClernon, J. F., Rabinovich, N. E., Sugai, C., Plath, L. C., Asgaard, G., … Botros, N. (2004). Effects of quitting smoking on EEG activation and attention last for more than 31 days and are more severe with stress, dependence, DRD2 A 1 allele, and depressive traits. Nicotine and Tobacco Research, 6, 249–267. doi:1 0.1 080/1462220041 0001676305.

For references with the same surname and initials but different first name provide the first name as follows:

    • Janet, P. [Paul]. (1876). La notion de la personnalité [The notion of personality]. Revue Scientifique, 10, 574–575.
    • Janet, P. [Pierre]. (1906). The pathogenesis of some impulsions. Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 1, 1–17.

Text citation to be given as follows: (Paul Janet, 1876) (Pierre Janet, 1906)

For references of two or more primary authors with the same surname, include the first author's initials in all text citations, even if the year of publication differs.

    • Light, I. (2006). Deflecting immigration: Networks, markets, and regulation in Los Angeles. New York, NY: Russell Sage Foundation.
    • Light, M. A., & Light, I. H. (2008). The geographic expansion of Mexican immigration in the United States and its implications for local law enforcement. Law Enforcement Executive Forum Journal, 8, 73–82.

Examples of text citation: Among studies, we review M.A. Light and Light (2008). I. Light (2006) studies this concept.

If two references of more than three surnames with the same year shorten to the same form e.g. both Ireys, Chernoff, DeVet, & Kim, 2001, and Ireys, Chernoff, Stein, DeVet, & Silver, 2001 shorten to Ireys et al., 2001)

Then cite the surnames of the first authors and of as many of the subsequent authors as necessary to distinguish the two references, followed by a comma and et al.:

Ireys, Chernoff, DeVet, et al. (2001) and Ireys, Chernoff, Stein, et al. (2001)

  • Do not include personal communications, such as letters, memoranda, and informal electronic communications in references but do cite these in the text. Examples of a citation of personal communication are: (V. G. Nguyen, personal communication, September 28, 1999); T. K. Lutes (personal communication, April 18, 2001).

Use Arabic numerals even if some volume numbers of books and journals are given in roman numerals (e.g. Vol. 3 not Vol. III).

Examples of references: Journals:

  • Burns, P. (2002a). The intergovernmental regime: A public policy in Hartford, Connecticut. Journal of Urban Affairs, 24(7), 55–73.
  • Burns, P. (2002b). The intergovernmental regime: A public policy in Hartford, Connecticut. Journal of Urban Affairs, 24(September), 55–73.
  • Burns, P. (2002). The intergovernmental regime: A public policy in Hartford, Connecticut. Journal of Urban Affairs, 24(Autumn), 55–73.
  • Burns, P. (in press-a). The intergovernmental regime: A public policy in Hartford, Connecticut. Journal of Urban Affairs, 24(7), 55–73.
  • Burns, P., & Johanson, R. (Eds.). (2002). The intergovernmental regime: A public policy in Hartford, Connecticut. Journal of Urban Affairs, 24(7), 55–73.

Books:

  • Alexander, C. F. (1996). The theory and practice of Ku Klux Klan in the southwest. Lexington: University of Kentucky Press.
  • Alexander, C. F. (1996). The theory and practice of Ku Klux Klan in the southwest [Brochure]. Lexington: University of Kentucky Press.
  • American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (AICPA). (2002). Statement on auditing standards no. 99: Consideration of fraud in a financial audit. New York, NY: AICPA.
  • Arnold, M. B. (1960). Emotion and personality: Psychological aspects (2nd ed., pp. 34–48). New York, NY: Columbia University Press.
  • Merriam-Webster’s collegiate dictionary (10th ed.). (1993). London: Merriam-Webster.
  • Citation: (Merriam-Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary, 1993). 

Edited Books:

  • Bridges, A., Burns, B., & Cash, A. (1989). Becoming an American: The working classes in the United States before the Civil War. In I. Katezelson & A. Zolvo (Eds.), Working class formation: A subject class (2nd ed., Vol. 6, pp. 110–125). Princeton, NJ: Wiley.
  • Bridges, A., & Burns, B. (with Cash, C. A.) (1989). Becoming an American: The working classes in the United States before the Civil War. In I. Katezelson (Ed.), Working class formation: A subject class (2nd ed., Vol. 6, pp. 110–125). London: City University.
  • Bridges, A., Burns, B., & Cash, A. (Eds.). (1989). Becoming an American: The working classes in the United States before the Civil War. In Working class formation: A subject class (2nd ed., Vol. 6, p. 125). Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.
  • Simmel, G. (1950). The stranger. In K. Wolff (Ed. & Trans.), The sociology of Georg Simmel. New York, NY: Free Press (Original work published in 1908).

PHD Thesis

  • Lowe, R. (1967). Racial segregation in Indiana. Ph.D. thesis, Ball State University, Munice, IN, USA.

Dissertation

  • Sinaceur, M. (2006). Suspending judgments to create value: Suspicion, distrust and trust in negotiations. Dissertation, Stanford University

Proceedings

  • Chalmers, D. (1965). Becoming an American in today’s world. In I. Katezelson (Ed.), Proceedings of the 4th international conference meeting, Bronx, Germany (pp. 1–27).

Unpublished data

  • Chalmers, D. (1965). Racial segregation in Indiana. Unpublished data. Department of Biotechnology, University of Antwerp, Belgium

Translation

  • John, A., Williams, R., & Monste, E. (2000). Article title in German. Journal name in German. [Translation of Journal Name in English.], 47, 1–10.

Book Translation

  • John, A., Williams, R., & Monste, E. (2000). In H. Johanson & K. Mark (Trans.), Book name in French (pp. 1–20). [Book name in English.] Place: Publisher

Book Series

  • John, A., Williams, R., & Monste, E. (2000). Article title. In T. Monste (Ed.), Book name. Book Title Series. Place: Publisher

Technical Report

  • Bonn, M. (2000). Racial segregation in Indiana. Technical Report no. 29876765. University of Wisconsin, WI, USA.
  • Author, A. (2001). Article title. Technical Report. Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin 1897287. University of Wisconsin, WI, USA.
  • Armstrong, J., Deeble, J., Dror, D. M., Rice, N., Thiede, M., & Van de Ven, W. P. M. M. (2004, February 16). The International Review Panel report to the South African Risk Equalization Fund Task Group. Retrieved from http://www.medicalschemes.com/publications/publications.aspx?catid=23. Accessed on March 9, 2007.
  • Armstrong, J., Deeble, J., & Dror, D. M. (2004, February 16). The International Review Panel report to the South African Risk Equalization Fund Task Group. Retrieved from http://www.medicalschemes.com/publications/publications.aspx?catid=23. Accessed on March 9

Working paper, mimeo, discussion paper

  • John, A. (2000). Article title. Working Paper No. 1897287. University of Wisconsin, WI.
  • John, A. (2001). Article title. Working Paper. Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin 1897287. University of Wisconsin, WI.
  • Bonn, M. (2000). Racial segregation in Indiana. Discussion paper. University of Wisconsin, WI.

Paper presented

  • John, A., Williams, R., & Monste, E. (2000). Value and the world economy today. Paper presented at the International Association of Conflict Management, Seville, Spain.
  • Wang, C. S., Phillips, K. W., Loyd, D. L., & Lount, R. B., Jr. (2005). The conflict between how we feel and how we think: Affective and cognitive reactions to disagreement from socially similar and dissimilar others. Paper presented at Academy of Management, Honolulu, HI.

Newspaper article

  • New York Times. (1980). Article title. New York Times, June 12, p. 168.
    John, R. (1990). Article title. New York Times, June 12, p. 45.

Manuscript submitted

  • Smith, P. K., & Bargh, J. A. (2004). Nonconscious effects of power on basic approach and avoidance tendencies. Manuscript submitted for publication.
  • Young, R. C., Keltner, D., Londahl, E. A., Capps, L. M., & Tauer, J. T. (1999). The pleasures of talking trash: Development, social status, and teasing. Unpublished manuscript.

URL

DOI

  • Schiraldi, G. R. (2001). The post-traumatic stress disorder sourcebook: A guide to healing, recovery, and growth [Adobe Digital Editions version]. doi:10.1036/0071393

Submit your manuscript

There are a number of key steps you should follow to ensure a smooth and trouble-free submission.

Double check your manuscript

Before submitting your work, it is your responsibility to check that the manuscript is complete, grammatically correct, and without spelling or typographical errors. A few other important points:

  • Give the journal aims and scope a final read. Is your manuscript definitely a good fit? If it isn’t, the editor may decline it without peer review.
  • Does your manuscript comply with our research and publishing ethics guidelines?
  • Have you cleared any necessary publishing permissions?
  • Have you followed all the formatting requirements laid out in these author guidelines?
  • Does the manuscript contain any information that might help the reviewer identify you? This could compromise the blind peer review process. A few tips:
    • If you need to refer to your own work, use wording such as ‘previous research has demonstrated’ not ‘our previous research has demonstrated’.
    • If you need to refer to your own, currently unpublished work, don’t include this work in the reference list.
    • Any acknowledgments or author biographies should be uploaded as separate files.
    • Carry out a final check to ensure that no author names appear anywhere in the manuscript. This includes in figures or captions.

You will find a helpful submission checklist on the website Think.Check.Submit.

The submission process

All manuscripts should be submitted through our editorial system by the corresponding author.

A separate author account is required for each journal you submit to. If this is your first time submitting to this journal, please choose the Create an account or Register now option in the editorial system. If you already have an Emerald login, you are welcome to reuse the existing username and password here.

Please note, the next time you log into the system, you will be asked for your username. This will be the email address you entered when you set up your account.

Don't forget to add your ORCiD ID during the submission process. It will be embedded in your published article, along with a link to the ORCiD registry allowing others to easily match you with your work.

Don’t have one yet? It only takes a few moments to register for a free ORCiD identifier.

Visit the ScholarOne support centre for further help and guidance.

What you can expect next

You will receive an automated email from the journal editor, confirming your successful submission. It will provide you with a manuscript number, which will be used in all future correspondence about your submission. If you have any reason to suspect the confirmation email you receive might be fraudulent, please contact our Rights team.

Post submission

Review and decision process

Each submission is checked by the editor. At this stage, they may choose to decline or unsubmit your manuscript if it doesn’t fit the journal aims and scope, or they feel the language/manuscript quality is too low.

If they think it might be suitable for the publication, they will send it to at least two independent referees for double blind peer review.  Once these reviewers have provided their feedback, the editor may decide to accept your manuscript, request minor or major revisions, or decline your work.

While all journals work to different timescales, the goal is that the editor will inform you of their first decision within 60 days.

During this period, we will send you automated updates on the progress of your manuscript via our submission system, or you can log in to check on the current status of your paper.  Each time we contact you, we will quote the manuscript number you were given at the point of submission. If you receive an email that does not match these criteria, it could be fraudulent and we recommend you email [email protected].

If your submission is accepted

Copyright

All accepted authors are sent an email with a link to a licence form.  This should be checked for accuracy, for example whether contact and affiliation details are up to date and your name is spelled correctly, and then returned to us electronically. If there is a reason why you can’t assign copyright to us, you should discuss this with your journal content editor. You will find their contact details on the editorial team section above.

Proofing and typesetting

Once we have received your completed licence form, the article will pass directly into the production process. We will carry out editorial checks, copyediting, and typesetting and then return proofs to you (if you are the corresponding author) for your review. This is your opportunity to correct any typographical errors, grammatical errors or incorrect author details. We can’t accept requests to rewrite texts at this stage.

When the page proofs are finalised, the fully typeset and proofed version of record is published online. This is referred to as the EarlyCite version. While an EarlyCite article has yet to be assigned to a volume or issue, it does have a digital object identifier (DOI) and is fully citable. It will be compiled into an issue according to the journal’s issue schedule, with papers being added by chronological date of publication.

How to share your paper

Visit our author rights page to find out how you can reuse and share your work.

To find tips on increasing the visibility of your published paper, read about how to promote your work.

Correcting inaccuracies in your published paper

Sometimes errors are made during the research, writing and publishing processes. When these issues arise, we have the option of withdrawing the paper or introducing a correction notice. Find out more about our article withdrawal and correction policies.

Need to make a change to the author list? See our frequently asked questions (FAQs) below.

Frequently asked questions

Is there a submission fee
for the journal?

The only time we will ever ask you for money to publish in an Emerald journal is if you have chosen to publish via the gold open access route. You will be asked to pay an APC (article processing charge) once your paper has been accepted (unless it is a sponsored open access journal). 

Read about our APCs

At no other time will you be asked to contribute financially towards your article’s publication. If you haven’t chosen gold open access and you receive an email which appears to be from Emerald, asking you for payment to publish, please contact our Rights team.

How can I become
a reviewer for a journal?

Please contact the editor for the journal, with a copy of your CV. You will find their contact details on the editorial team tab on this page.

Who do I contact if I want to find out which volume and issue my accepted paper will appear in?

Typically, papers are added to an issue according to their date of publication. If you would like to know in advance which issue your paper will appear in, please contact the content editor of the journal. You will find their contact details on the editorial team tab on this page. Once your paper has been published in an issue, you will be notified by email.

Who do I contact if I have
a query about my submission?

Please email the journal editor – you will find their contact details on the editorial team tab on this page. If you ever suspect an email you’ve received from Emerald might not be genuine, you are welcome to verify it with the content editor for the journal, whose contact details can be found on the editorial team tab on this page. Alternatively, you can email our Rights team.

Is my paper suitable
for the journal?

If you’ve read the aims and scope on the journal landing page and are still unsure whether your paper is suitable for the journal, please email the editor and include your paper's title and structured abstract. They will be able to advise on your manuscript’s suitability. You will find their contact details on the Editorial team tab on this page.

How do I make a change to the list of authors once the manuscript has been submitted?

Authorship and the order in which the authors are listed on the paper should be agreed prior to submission. If you need to make any changes to the author information once the paper is under review or has been accepted, we will look into your request and closely follow the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE) authorship guidelines. We will also require a statement from each author confirming their agreement.

This journal is included in the following abstract and indexing services:

  • EBSCO Discovery Service
  • Google Scholar
  • Summons (ProQuest)
  • WorldCat

Transparency Statement for Railway Sciences

1. Journal Ownership: Railway Sciences  is published by Emerald Publishing on behalf of China Academy of Railway Sciences Corporation Limited.

2. Governing Body: The editorial team is appointed and managed by China Academy of Railway Sciences Corporation Limited. The journal is governed by the editorial team in collaboration with Emerald Publishing.

3. Peer Review Process: The journal operates a double blind peer review model. All articles undergo an initial assessment by the journal editor. If they are considered suitable for consideration, articles will then be a reviewed by a minimum of two external reviewers to assess suitability for publication. Final responsibility for editorial decisions rests with the Editor-in-Chief of the journal.

4. Editorial team/contact information: Contact details for the editorial team can be found on the journal homepage here. Queries may also be directed to Emerald’s Publishing team as follows:
Eva Chen:
Publishing Services Manager – [email protected]  

5. Copyright: All articles in the journal are published Open Access under a Creative Commons Attribution license (CC BY-4.0). This allows authors to retain copyright of their work whilst others can share, use and build upon this work created as long as appropriate attribution is given.

6. Author Fees: The journal is published under a Platinum Open Access arrangement, in that all costs associated with publishing an Open Access article in the journal are funded by the China Academy of Railway Sciences Corporation Limited. There are currently no Article Processing Charges to the author(s).

7. Allegations of Misconduct: All journals published by Emerald are members of and subscribe to the principles of the Committee on Publication Ethics. In the event of any allegation of research or publication misconduct the publisher and editor will adhere to COPE guidelines in dealing with such allegations.

8. Conflicts of interest: Authors are asked to declare any financial or ethical conflicts of interest upon submitting their work to the journal. Difficult cases will be referred to the Committee on Publishing Ethics (COPE) for advice.

9. Frequency: The journal publishes 2 issues per annum.

10. Access: All journal articles are published Open Access on EmeraldInsight.com - https://www.emerald.com/loi/rs under a CCBY 4.0 licence (please see section 5).

11. Revenue sources: The journal is published under a platinum Open Access arrangement, in that all costs associated with publishing an Open Access article in the journal are funded by the China Academy of Railway Sciences Corporation Limited.

12. Advertising: The journal does not accept direct advertising.

13. Archiving: Emerald provides perpetual access for all e-journal content by working with digital preservation schemes Portico, LOCKSS and CLOCKSS.

14. Direct marketing: On occasion the journal will use direct marketing activities (primarily email campaigns) to raise awareness of the journal and to invite authors to submit articles. Marketing activities are conducted by China Academy of Railway Sciences Corporation Limited unless otherwise agreed with Emerald.

 

This statement was prepared by Eva Chen (Emerald Publishing) on 6 March 2022.